Kenya’s IEBC dangles “kitu kidogo” for political parties to avoid publishing election results

The Star reported this week that the “IEBC wants political parties act amended“. From the headline one would expect to read perhaps an article on some type of reform arising out of the failed primary elections early this year, or the problem with “party hopping” . . .

But of course, it would be silly to think that the IEBC would concern itself with such things to improve accountability in the Kenyan electoral system.

No, the IEBC is faced with a problem. It doesn’t want to publish the election results. For the reason noted in my last post: the numbers of votes for the other offices don’t add up to the numbers of votes for president–according to the anonymous Commissioner quoted in the story, adding a direct confession to the clear circumstantial evidence that we have all seen for many weeks now.

The IEBC is attracting no visible pressure from Washington or London or the other “donors” who helped underwrite the IEBC. Whether this is because, as in 2007-08, the foreign policy mavens think it’s “better not to know” or whether because, as always, the foreign assistance mavens want a “success story” as much as a better democracy in Kenya in the future–or both–I don’t know.

So the immediate rub is the delay in providing public funding to Kenya’s political parties based on the election results. How to relieve pressure from pols who want the tax dollars doled out without publishing the election results that determine how the money is allocated? Change the law of course! So the money can be paid out without disclosing the results! An elegantly Kenyan solution.

4 thoughts on “Kenya’s IEBC dangles “kitu kidogo” for political parties to avoid publishing election results

  1. Pingback: Kenyan Parliamentary committee summons registrar of parties; issues include failure to publish election results | AfriCommons Blog

  2. Pingback: It’s mid-June: another month goes by without Kenya’s election results while Hassan goes to Washington | AfriCommons Blog

  3. Pingback: “The long, long vote count” –new reporting from Kenya in Africa Confidential | AfriCommons Blog

  4. Pingback: The “top ten” most shared posts from the first five years of AfriCommons | AfriCommons Blog

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